Blog :: 03-2020

Our Response To COVID-19

To Our Customers, Clients and Friends:

 

Our strategy for how best to deal with the impacts of the COVID-19 virus continues to evolve. Our offices are open on a limited basis with basic staffing. A number of our team are working from home. We continue to be available to you during normal business hours by telephone or email. We are dedicated to providing the support you need. Please call or email any of us if you have questions about properties that are for sale or negotiations and transactions in process.

Vermonters are resourceful and we are experiencing this every day as home inspectors, lenders, attorneys, town clerks and so many others that play important roles in real estate transactions work to overcome obstacles as we all work together to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

The process of viewing homes and properties is a challenge in respect to the call for social distancing and concern for all parties. We are still showing homes and other properties and ask that everyone use their best judgement to determine if a viewing is appropriate or it might be a situation where all involved will be best served if postponed until life can go back to normal. Hopefully this will be in just a few weeks.

Our website at HeneyRealtors.com is a great resource and we will work to ensure you have access to the most current information possible. Please feel free to reach out if we can be of assistance in any way.

Your Heney Realtors Team

 

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    Vermont = 2.07 Million Gallons of Maple Syrup in 2019

    A total of 4.2 million gallons of maple syrup was produced in the United States last year and Vermont produced 49% of that
    amount with New York State and Maine being the second and third largest producers. But it was not always miles of sap lines
    and vacuum systems to gently pull the sap from the trees and reverse osmosis to remove much of the water prior to boiling. When sugaring season begins, and it may only last 35 days, is when I am most proud of my maternal grandfather, Edward H. Jones who was Vermont’s Commissioner of Agriculture from 1924 to 1944 working under eight Vermont Governors. Ed recognized the need for cleanliness to make the higher grades of maple syrup, with advice such as “gather sap from clean, covered pails” and introduced maple syrup labels for the cans proudly stating “fully guaranteed under the pure food laws to contain nothing but the product of maple.”

    Ed was also a leader in developing maple cream as a commercial product and proudly shipped Valley Mead Farm products across the United States. We have made real progress in the direction of producing better quality farm stuff and getting it to market. Ed was proud to advertise and market maple products and even had a miniature sugarhouse which he loaded on trains and showed the sugaring process at conventions and expositions around the states. My ninth-generation nieces and nephews still use this structure today. I sincerely hope you will visit a sugarhouse this year and try some “sugar on snow” with plain donuts and sour pickles which is a long-standing Vermont tradition and possibly remember the man who was looking into the future so long ago. 

    By Dave Jamieson, Broker 

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      Remembering- Growing Up and Sugaring!

      This picture is the road leading up to the present day Von Trapp farm on Waitsfield Common. The snow was plowed with a mechanical giant on tracks with a V plow and wings to push the snow back, hence the near vertical snow banks separating us from the sap buckets. My brother Dick, Howard Corliss and Alan Richardson would gather the sap, removing the ice from the buckets (ensuring your hands were always wet and cold) and climb back down to dump the sap into the holding tank pulled by our horses Tom and Jerry.

      Our day would start early with chores of cleaning, watering and feeding in the barn and then to the house for breakfast and then off to gather sap which was a great cash crop for the farm and very important for our family income. Lunch was often delivered to the sugarhouse where we boiled eggs in the sap and had a quick lunch before returning to our gathering duties. This was not just for sunny days and we worked in cold rain, snow and I remember well breaking through the crust with each step while trying not to spill the precious sap before we delivered to the dray.

      And just when darkness approached and hopefully the day was finished, we would remember we had to do the barn chores. A quick supper and then back to the barn for all the all too familiar cleaning, watering and feeding and finally the end of the day. When we finally entered the house, our mother would look at us and say “what about your homework.” This has often made me wonder if this was the reason I never became a scholar. 

      By Dave Jamieson, Broker

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